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How To Cite An Article: MLA, APA, and Chicago in Text

Cite An Article

How To Cite An Article: MLA, APA, and Chicago in Text

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Citing an article in text is how you credit your sources when writing a paper. It’s most common for academic papers, but even journalists use it. If some of your research was taken from another source, it’s necessary to cite those sources in the text so that readers can find them easily. In this guide, we’ll go over how to cite articles using MLA, APA, and Chicago styles so that you can be sure your citations are correct!

How to cite an article MLA in text

Want to use an MLA in-text citation? Perhaps you’re researching and need to know how to properly reference a book or journal article using MLA in-text citations. Whatever the case may be, we’re here to assist you.

Accurately citing sources is a major component of academic writing.  The Modern Language Association (MLA) style is one of the most commonly used citation formats. Whether you’re a student, writer, or researcher, knowing how to cite an article in MLA in-text is essential for crediting the original authors and avoiding plagiarism.

Understanding how to cite an article in an essay MLA Style: 

MLA in-text citations are brief references within the text of your paper that direct readers to the full citation in your Works Cited page. The purpose of in-text citations is to identify the source of your information. It supports the credibility of your research and allows readers to find the sources for further reading.

Basic Structure of an MLA In-Text Citation

When citing an article in MLA in-text, you only need to include the author’s last name and the source’s page number(s). This information is enclosed in parentheses and placed directly after the borrowed material. For printed articles, use the following format:

(Author’s Last Name Page Number).

For online articles, include the author’s last name and a shortened version of the article title, followed by the page number:

(Author’s Last Name “Shortened Title” Page Number).

Step-by-Step Guide to MLA In-Text Citations

For a better understanding, here is how you can use MLA for citations:

Author’s Last Name:

 Begin with the author’s last name, followed by a space.

If you cite an article with an author or editor, write their name in italics. If there is more than one author, use “and” between them (e.g., Smith and Jones). If there is only one author and they have a middle initial, include it after their last name (e.g., Smith J.). If there are multiple editors listed on the work, you’re citing, use “ed.” before each editor’s name (e.g., eds.).

Page Number(s): 

Include the page(s) of the original article after the author’s last name to indicate where the material was originally published. Separate multiple page numbers with a comma. 

Punctuation: 

Enclose the citation within parentheses and place it directly after the borrowed material.

The comma separates the last information you give about an author or editor from the next piece of information, so it would be wrong to leave out this punctuation mark if there is more than one line of text after your citation. For example:

The main rule of MLA style is that all sentences should end with a period, question mark or exclamation point (no semicolons). The second rule is that every sentence must also begin with a capital letter unless it’s at the beginning of a quotation within another sentence (“I love chocolate cake!” my brother said). The third rule states that all titles must be italicized except for short works like poems and articles by famous authors such as Shakespeare or Twain; these should be placed in quotation marks instead.

Write the title of your source in italics.

The title of your source should be written in italics. If there is no author or editor, skip this part.

Include the name of the person who wrote the source, their position in the company, and their title. If there is no author or editor, skip this part.

If the source is a web page, you should include all the information you find on the page. If there is no author or editor, skip this part. Include the name of the person who wrote the source, their position in the company, and their title.

Examples of MLA In-Text Citations:

  • For a printed article: (Smith 45).
  • For an online article: (Smith “MLA Citations” 12).

How to cite an article with multiple authors (For MLA)

In MLA style, citing articles with multiple authors follows a similar format as APA. List the names of all authors, using “and” to separate the last two names. Here’s how to do it:

  • List all authors’ last names and first names, separated by commas.
  • Use “and” before the last author’s name.
  • Include the page number in parentheses (if applicable) after the author names.
  • Example: Smith, John, Jane Doe, and Emily Johnson.
  • In-Text Citation (MLA): (Smith, Doe, and Johnson

Citing Online Article: 

If you cite an article online, use the URL in parentheses. The URL should be the first line of your citation, followed by a period and whatever follows in brackets ([]) if there are any additional details about where to find this information. If there is no author or editor listed on a site (as is often the case with Wikipedia), do not add them here:

Citing Print Source: 

If you cite a print source, begin with the author’s last name and initial. If no author is listed on the work, use an editor instead of an author: For example: If multiple authors or editors are listed on a piece of writing, separate them with semicolons. Do not include other identifying information, such as titles or publication dates, in this part of your citation.

MLA Style for No Authors:

In MLA style, when an article has no identifiable author, you can use the article’s title as the starting point for the citation. Here’s how to do it:

Begin the citation with the title of the article in sentence case.

Enclose the article title in double quotation marks.

Include the publication details, such as the title of the journal (in italics), volume number, issue number (if applicable), publication year, and page range.

Example: “Unlocking the Secrets of Citing Articles.” Journal of Academic Writing, vol. 10, no. 2, 2023, pp. 45-58.

How to cite an article APA in text

Citing sources accurately is a crucial aspect of academic writing, and the American Psychological Association (APA) style is one of the most widely used citation formats. Whether you’re a student, researcher, or writer, knowing how to cite an article in APA style is essential for crediting the original authors and avoiding plagiarism.

APA style is a standardized format used to cite humanities, social sciences and life sciences sources. APA citations usually appear at the end of your paper in a section called “references.” this section contains all of the works you’ve cited within your text body. Citing an article in APA style requires a few guidelines:

As a book writing service provider, you need to understand these guidelines; that is why we will journey into APA citation. 

Understanding how to cite an article in an essay APA Style: 

The APA style is a set of rules and guidelines established by the American Psychological Association. It is primarily used in psychology, education, and social sciences. It is designed to promote clarity and consistency in academic writing, making it easier for readers to comprehend and follow the flow of ideas. In APA style, citations are used both in-text and in the reference list at the end of the paper.

Basic Structure of an APA Style Article Citation

Citing an article in APA style involves providing specific details about the article’s author, title, publication date, and source. The format may differ slightly depending on whether you cite a print or online article. Here’s the basic structure for a printed article:

  • Author’s Last Name, First Initial.
  • (Year of Publication).
  • Article Title.
  • Journal Title, Volume Number(Issue Number), Page Range.
  • For an online article, include the DOI (Digital Object Identifier) or the URL instead of page numbers.

Step-by-Step Guide to Citing an Article in APA Style

If you want to cite an article with APA style, follow the guideline below. 

Cite all sources: 

Citing an article in APA style requires a few guidelines. First, you must cite all sources–including books, articles and websites. Then you need to include the author’s name, publication date, and page number.

Use Parentheses: 

Citations are placed in parentheses at the end of a sentence or phrase, including information from another source. For example: “The study found that reading novels increases empathy (Karr et al., 2015).”

Identify the author, date, and page number(s).

The next step in citing an article is identifying the author, publication date, and page number(s). In APA style, this information goes in parentheses after the citation signal (a superscripted numeral 1) and before any punctuation.

Author’s last name, first initial. (Date of publication). Page numbers as needed.

Write out the title of the source article.

The first thing to do is write out the title of your source article. This will be italicized, so you should not use quotation marks or bolding.

All caps are also discouraged; they’re usually reserved for titles like books (like When You Write Romance Novels and Movies or the articles written by Ghostwriters for hire), which aren’t considered scholarly sources.

Note the page number(s) at the end of the sentence:

The next step is to add the page number(s) in parentheses after the period at the end of your sentence. If you have more than one source, list them in order by date and then by author’s last name. For example:

Examining how these findings compare with those from other studies that were conducted using similar methodologies (Smith & Jones, 2019; Jones et al., 2018)

  • Smith, J. (2023). Exploring the Wonders of APA Article Citation. Journal of Academic Writing, 10(2), 45-58.

In-Text Citations:

In APA style, in-text citations include the author’s last name and the year of publication, separated by a comma and enclosed in parentheses. If you directly quote the article, include the page number as well.

  • For example: (Smith, 2023) or (Smith, 2023, p. 47)

How to cite an article with multiple authors APA Style: 

In APA style, citing an article with multiple authors follows a simple format. List all authors’ last names and initials, using an ampersand (&) to separate the last two names. Here’s the step-by-step guide:

  • List all authors’ last names and initials, separated by commas.
  • Use an ampersand (&) before the last author’s name.
  • Include the publication year in parentheses after the author’s name.
  • Example: Smith, J., Doe, A. R., & Johnson, E. (2023)
  • In-Text Citation (APA): (Smith, Doe, & Johnson, 2023)

How to cite an article with no author APA Style:

In APA style, when an article has no identifiable author, you can start the citation with the article’s title. Here’s the step-by-step guide:

  • Begin the citation with the article’s title in sentence case (only capitalize the first word and any proper nouns).
  • Use double quotation marks around the title of the article.
  • Include the publication year in parentheses.
  • Add the publication details, such as the journal title, volume number (in italics), issue number (in parentheses), and page range.
  • Example: “Unlocking the Secrets of Citing Articles.” (2023). Journal of Academic Writing, 10(2), 45-58.
  • In-Text Citation (APA): (“Unlocking the Secrets,” 2023)

How to cite an article in Chicago

When it comes to academic writing and research, citing your sources correctly is paramount. One widely used citation style is the Chicago Manual of Style, often called “Chicago.” 

Whether you’re a student or a professional, understanding how to cite an article in Chicago style can be a game-changer. Now we’ll delve into the world of Chicago citation and provide a simple guide to help you master the art of giving proper credit to your sources.

What is Chicago Style?

Chicago style is a comprehensive citation system developed by the University of Chicago Press. It offers two main formats: the notes and bibliography style. It is commonly used in the humanities, and the author-date system, often used in the sciences and social sciences. 

This section of the article focuses on the notes and bibliography style, which is popular for academic writing.

Basic Structure of a Chicago Style Article Citation

In Chicago style, citing an article generally involves providing essential information about the article and its publication. The format may vary slightly depending on whether you use a print or online source. However, the core elements remain the same. For a printed article, the basic structure includes:

  • Author’s Name
  • Article Title (in quotation marks)
  • Journal Title (italicized)
  • Volume Number
  • Issue Number
  • Year of Publication
  • Page Numbers
  • URL (if the article is accessed online)

Let’s Break It Down

  • Author’s Name:

 The author’s name is usually First or Last in Chicago style.

  • Article Title:

 Enclose the title of the article in double quotation marks.

  • Journal Title:

 Italicize the title of the journal or periodical.

  • Volume and Issue Numbers:

 The volume number comes first, followed by the issue number in parentheses (if applicable).

  • Year of Publication: 

Provide the year of publication in parentheses.

  • Page Numbers: 

Specify the page range of the article.

  • URL (for online sources): 

If you accessed the article online, include the URL or DOI (Digital Object Identifier) at the end of the citation.

  • Sample Chicago Style Article Citation:
  • Smith, John. “Exploring the Wonders of Chicago Style Citation.” Journal of Academic Excellence 12(3) (2023): 45-58. https://www.example.com/article123.
  • In-Text Citations:

In the notes and bibliography style, in-text citations are represented as footnotes or endnotes. When you reference a source in your text, insert a superscript number. This would correspond to the corresponding footnote or endnote. In the footnote or endnote, provide the full citation details of the source.

How to cite an article with multiple authors Chicago style

Chicago style offers two citation options: the notes, bibliography, and author-date styles. We’ll focus on the notes and bibliography style commonly used in the humanities for citing articles with multiple authors.

  • List all authors’ last and first names in the order they appear in the article.
  • Include the article title in quotation marks and the journal title in italics.
  • Specify the publication details, such as volume, issue number (if applicable), and page range.
  • Example: Smith, John, Jane Doe, and Emily Johnson. “Unlocking the Secrets of Citation Styles.” Journal of Academic Writing 10, no. 2 (2023): 45-58.
  • In-Text Citation (Chicago): (Smith, Doe, and Johnson 45).

Chicago Style for No Authors:

In Chicago style, citing an article with no identifiable author follows a format similar to MLA. Here’s how to do it:

  • Begin the citation with the title of the article in sentence case.
  • Enclose the article title in double quotation marks.
  • Include the publication details, such as the title of the journal (in italics), volume number, issue number (if applicable), publication year, and page range.
  • Example: “Unlocking the Secrets of Citing Articles.” Journal of Academic Writing 10, no. 2 (2023): 45-58.

5 Tips to Cite Your Paper

When writing a paper, there are plenty of things to worry about. The citation style, however, is not one of them. If you’ve ever tried to cite something in an academic paper and had trouble finding the information or ended up with incorrect information in your citations, then continue to read this section. Citing properly can be tricky at first—especially if you’re unfamiliar with the rules—but it will become second nature once you have the hang of it.

  1.  Start with the right tools

When you’re ready to cite your sources, there are a few tools that can help. If you have access to the internet, CITE (the Citation Tool) is available for free on all computers at any time. This tool allows users to create citations quickly and easily by providing an easy-to-use interface. It also allows users to keep track of their citations in one place, making it easier than ever!

  1.  Keep your citations organized.

The last thing you want is to dig through endless pages of notes or books when it comes time to cite a source. To avoid this, keep all your sources in one place and label them with a bibliographic entry (like a citation). You can also use software like EndNote or RefWorks to help automate the process!

  1.  Format your paper correctly

To make sure you cite your sources correctly, it’s important to format your paper correctly. This means using the correct citation format and ensuring your citations are consistent. 

Include enough information if you’re citing something from an online source (like an article on a website or an email). This way, someone else could find the same source if they wanted to read it themselves.

 It’s also helpful for readers if you have a bibliography at the end of each chapter. This way, people can see what other books and articles were used in researching this topic!

  1.  Get help when you need it:

If you’re unsure how to cite your sources, ask for help. Your librarian and professor are there to help you with this process (and they’re also the ones who will grade your paper). If they don’t know how to do it, use Google or another search engine as a last resort.

Don’t forget that you can also link to sources when you’re writing your paper. If you do this, be sure to cite them properly as well.

Takeaway:

When writing a paper, using the right citation style is important. For example, if you’re writing in MLA style and your professor requires APA citations, they won’t accept your paper.

This guide will help you understand how to cite articles using different citation styles: MLA, APA and Chicago.

We hope this guide has helped you understand how to cite an article in a text. We have included examples from MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles so you can see how each one works.

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